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Can You Go to Jail for False Accusations in Texas?

Many people give statements to the police in good faith, and those statements might not be 100 percent accurate. That doesn’t mean they’ve done anything wrong. For instance, if you witness a robbery at a grocery store, you can’t be prosecuted for saying the person was wearing a white shirt when they were actually wearing a red shirt.

Inaccuracies or information that proves false later might not constitute a criminal act. So long as you weren’t seeking to gain from false accusations and so long as you gave information to the best of your knowledge at the time, you shouldn’t get into any trouble.

That being said, there are people who give false information to the police intentionally. You might be wondering: Can you go to jail for false accusations in Texas?

Why Do People Give False Information to the Police?

People give false information to the police, or to the court, for a variety of reasons.

They may want to get someone in trouble because of anger toward that person. They might provide false information in an effort to protect themselves from prosecution for another offense. They could give false information because they are trying to protect a family member from getting into trouble.

Whatever the case may be, you can be prosecuted for giving false information if you knew the information was false when you gave it.

What Can Happen to You if You’re Convicted of Lying to the Police?

If you’re charged with providing false information to the police, or to a court official, you can be charged with a misdemeanor crime in Texas. You could go to jail or suffer other penalties for this behavior.

Get in Contact with a Texas Criminal Defense Attorney

Yes, you can go to jail for false accusations in Texas. If you’re facing a crime related to lying to the police or other court officials, get in contact with a criminal defense attorney. An attorney can help you build a defense against conviction. Contact Crain Lewis Brogdon, LLP by using the contact form below or by calling 214-522-9404.